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BJJ Point System (Full Guide with Images and FAQ)

BJJ Point System Explained

Let’s breakdown the bjj point system:

The BJJ point system is:
Take down= 2 points
Sweep = 2 points
Knee-on-belly = 2 points
Passing the opponent’s guard (legs)= 3 points
Mount position = 4 points
Back control = 4

Know that in order to achieve points in a bjj competition, points are gained from the specifc movements and positions mentioned above, and are only awarded after 3 seconds of controlling the position

Note: if a submission is successfully performed by either competitor, it is considered an immediate victory and points are no longer valued*


BJJ Point System – Key Takeaways

  • Different BJJ Organizations award points based on certain positions, submission attempts, or aggressiveness.
  • The largest organizations that holds BJJ events it the IBJJF (International Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Federation) followed closely (now) by ADCC (Abu Dhabi Combat Club)

Here is the IBJJF Scoring System:

Take down2 points
Sweep from bottom2 points
Knee-on-belly2 points
Passing the guard (legs)3 points
Mount4 points
Rear mount – taking their back and achieving both of your hooks in (legs)4 points

Here is the ADCC Scoring System

TechniquePointsDescription
Passing the guard3Judges will award points if control is demonstrated where at least 75% of the opponent’s back is on the mat.
Knee on stomach2Either inside or outside knee can score. The knee must be in the middle of the stomach, not on the chest or the sides. The opponent can’t be on their side. Additional points awarded if the knee is removed and then repositioned on the stomach for 3 seconds or more. The positioning of the other leg is irrelevant.
Mount position2Both knees must be touching the floor. Referees will assess control for scoring in case of size differences. Reverse mount also scores. Trapping of opponent’s hand(s) under your legs still scores. Both of your knees must be below the shoulder line. Your opponent’s back must be on the floor.
Back mount with hooks3Both hooks and body triangle are acceptable. Repeated scoring possible if hooks or body triangle are released and then reestablished for 3 seconds or more. Hooks must not be over any of the shoulders.
Take down (ends Guard or Half Guard)2Opponent’s butt or back needs to be on the mats for 3 secs. Points only awarded after escaping any submission threat and position is solidified for 3 secs.
Clean Take down (ends passed the guard)4Must be outside the guard, not in the threat of a submission, and 75% or more of the opponent’s back must be on the mat. The position must be solidified for 3 secs or more.
Sweeps (ends Guard or Half Guard)2Sweeps involve changing the position from bottom to top and holding for 3 secs or more. The sweeper must not be under threat of a submission.
Clean Sweep (ends passed the guard)4Involves changing the position from bottom to top, ending up outside guard, while more than 75% of the opponent’s back is on the floor. Position must be established for 3 secs or more. No threat of a submission allowed.
Reversals (from side-control or mount)2 or 4Points awarded for reversing position from bottom to top: 2 points for ending in guard, 4 points for ending in side-control.

IBJJF Scoring System

First, let’s talk about the IBJJf scoring system:

Take down2 points
Sweep from bottom2 points
Knee-on-belly2 points
Passing the guard (legs)3 points
Mount4 points
Rear mount – taking their back and achieving both of your hooks in (legs)4 points

The IBJJF is likely the mostly popular bjj organization in the world that frequently holds a variety of prominent bjj tournament and competitions.

Several other popular bjj organizations that also hold events and competitions take their scoring system from the IBJJF scoring system.



Although points will give you an advantage you should still aim to submit your opponent as fast as you can. Why? It is because a submission is an immediate victory.

So if you were able to garner a lot of points, but your opponent was able to successfully submit you, they win. 

Another reason why you need to know how the point system works is that you should train in the style of the tournament that your are preparing for.

If you are competing in a point based tournament such as one held by the IBJJF, you’re training you involve:

  • always trying to get and stay on top
  • working on your sweeps
  • preventing guard passes
  • practicing turtle defense

Of course, there are different organizations hosting BJJ competitions with their own set of rules and point system. Hence, you need to read their rules and regulations prior to the competition, prepare with that point system in mind and be very aware of avoid penalties and disadvantages.

For example, while in some tournaments “pulling guard” is allowed, in other tournaments it will incur a disadvantage or points for your opponent.

So read on, and learn about the different ways to get you that gold! 


Take down

Points Scored: 2

We all know that all BJJ competitions start with standing on two feet. Now you are starting to grapple.

If you find yourself an opening, make a move and take your opponent down. Make sure to do it properly, making them land on their back/sideways or in a seated position. Then you will be able to score. 

But the catch here is that you must be able to hold a dominant position after the take down for 3 seconds. This is according to the IBJJF standards.

So what are possible techniques you must do in order to take down your opponent? Here are some: 

Again, remember, find yourself in a dominant position after. You have to maintain this for 3 seconds in order to score.

What are some of these dominant positions? 

  • Side Control
  • Mount
  • Knee on Belly

Sweep from bottom

Points scored: 2

Another way to be able to be able to get 2 points during a match is by sweeping your opponent from the bottom. 

Now, a sweep is when the person at the bottom was able to improve their position by getting on top of their opponent. From here, they must maintain the top position for at least 3 seconds. 

Another thing to note is, you must start from a guard, or a half guard to be able to achieve this. 

Check out this video about 4 different sweeps that you can start working on, to improve your skill set.


Knee on Belly

Points scored: 2

If the competitor was able to place their knee or their shin on your ribs, chest or belly while you are down on your back or side they will be awarded 2 points. 

But the catch here is that they should be able to hold this position for at least 3 seconds. Also, one knee should be on the mat. 

Trust me, this is a painful spot to be stuck in. So if you see your opponent about to finalize this position, do your best to escape. Shrimp out already to work on guard or get up on your feet again.  

So how does one get to the knee on belly position? Well, the easiest way is from side control. From here, you push yourself up and place your knee on your opponent’s abdomen. 

Just make sure that you are balanced and the other leg is on the mat, at an angle that your opponent will not be able to grab. Why? They will try to off balance you in order to get away from the position. 

Again, note that this position is worth 2 points as long as you are able to hold it down for 3 seconds. 


Passing the Guard

Points scored: 3 

Yes, if you are able to pass your opponent’s guard, then you will easily be awarded 3 points. But what is this move that can give you a high score? 

So a guard pass is when you are in the top position, and you are able to break away from your opponent’s legs in guard or half guard. Thus, you will find yourself in either a side control or north-south position. 

If you are able positioned in side control or north-south already, you have to be able to maintain it for at least 3 seconds to be awarded 

A guard pass is when the competitor in the top position overcomes the bottom opponent’s legs in guard or half guard to end up in side control or north-south position. The passer must hold side control or north-south for three seconds to score.

Here are some of the tips we have for you to improve your guard passing: 

  • Posture up – This will give you more room to escape and prevent submission attempts. 
  • Open the closed guard – Break apart the closed guard in order to escape. 
  • Master basic positions – Learn your fundamentals, so you will know what to do next, if you were able to pass the guard already. 

Mount

Points scored: 4 

One of the most dominant and advantageous positions in BJJ is the mount. Now, a mount is defined as the one of the combatant’s sitting on top of the other person’s torso while facing in the direction of their head.

The key thing to note in this position is that both knees must be on the mat, or one knee and one foot. 

Just like the other ways to score, you must be able to hold this position for three seconds. 

Now, one thing I like about being in this position is that you can find other positions to control your opponent. Moreover, there are a lot of different attacks that you can work on. 

Here are some of the options you can add in your mount arsenal: 

  • Armbar
  • America 
  • Ezekiel Choke 
  • Mounted triangle
  • Cross Choke 

Rear Mount

Points scored: 4 

Just like the mount, the rear mount also known as taking the back will garner you 4 points. 

So the rear mount is where you control your opponent’s back. From this highly advantageous position there are several extremely effective submissions available such as the rear naked choke and rear triangle. However, in order to make rear mount highly effective, one of the keys is to constantly apply chest to back connection. You can use a variety of methods to do so such as a seat belt grip, body triangle, and tight head position.

 You must prevent escape by having either a body triangle, diagonal control or an arm trap. Always remember that once you are able to control the back, remember never to cross your feet. This is because you will be vulnerable to leg locks. 

Now from here, there are so many different attacks that you can do. Just like the following: 

Advantagies in IBJJF

In the International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation (IBJJF) rules, engaging an opponent is incentivized and disengagement is penalized.

  • When a competitor fails to maintain a position for a full three seconds, they may be awarded an advantage point.
    • For instance, if a mount is initiated but the opponent escapes before three seconds elapse, the player will still gain an advantage point for nearly achieving the mount.
  • Advantage points can also be given for nearly successful submission attempts.
    • The referee has the discretion to award an advantage point if they consider a submission was close to being completed.

Advantage points can even be awarded post-match, prior to the announcement of results, if there’s a tie. This decision rests entirely with the referee and might occasionally spark controversy.

However, advantage points only determine a match’s outcome when there’s a tie in points.

Penalties in IBJJF

Below are an example of penalties or fouls in the IBJJF – these can be a warning or can be severe as disqualification and possibly being banned from IBJJF events in the futuure

Disciplinary Penalties: These encompass infractions such as using profane language, making rude gestures, or displaying unsportsmanlike conduct. Referees have the authority to disqualify a player instantly at the moment of infraction, irrespective of the match status.

Technical Penalties: The IBJJF punishes players for failing to engage their opponent. A typical example is stalling, where a player with a points advantage remains inactive to run down the clock.

Serious Penalties: These are escalated versions of technical fouls, such as repeatedly leaving the match area to force restarts. For example, if an opponent stands up or disengages to avoid a sweep or submission, they can be awarded two points. Four serious penalties result in disqualification. In case of a tie in points and advantages, the competitor with fewer penalties wins.

Severe Penalties: These relate to illegal moves like the suplex or a spinal lock. The penalty for performing these moves is immediate disqualification. However, some moves become legal at higher levels, such as the heel hook in no-gi competitions at brown belt level.

A referee signals disqualification by stopping the match and forming an “X” with their arms. The referee, as the highest authority in a match according to the IBJJF rule book, has the final say.


ADCC Scoring System

ADCC Point System

ADCC Submission Fighting World Championship is a competition hosted by the Abu Dhabi Combat Club. 

This competition has its own set of rules as well. Note that each position must be established for 3 seconds and up while being out of any danger of submission in order for points to be awarded. 

TechniquePointsDescription
Passing the guard3Judges will award points if control is demonstrated where at least 75% of the opponent’s back is on the mat.
Knee on stomach2Either inside or outside knee can score. The knee must be in the middle of the stomach, not on the chest or the sides. The opponent can’t be on their side. Additional points awarded if the knee is removed and then repositioned on the stomach for 3 seconds or more. The positioning of the other leg is irrelevant.
Mount position2Both knees must be touching the floor. Referees will assess control for scoring in case of size differences. Reverse mount also scores. Trapping of opponent’s hand(s) under your legs still scores. Both of your knees must be below the shoulder line. Your opponent’s back must be on the floor.
Back mount with hooks3Both hooks and body triangle are acceptable. Repeated scoring possible if hooks or body triangle are released and then reestablished for 3 seconds or more. Hooks must not be over any of the shoulders.
Take down (ends Guard or Half Guard)2Opponent’s butt or back needs to be on the mats for 3 secs. Points only awarded after escaping any submission threat and position is solidified for 3 secs.
Clean Take down (ends passed the guard)4Must be outside the guard, not in the threat of a submission, and 75% or more of the opponent’s back must be on the mat. The position must be solidified for 3 secs or more.
Sweeps (ends Guard or Half Guard)2Sweeps involve changing the position from bottom to top and holding for 3 secs or more. The sweeper must not be under threat of a submission.
Clean Sweep (ends passed the guard)4Involves changing the position from bottom to top, ending up outside guard, while more than 75% of the opponent’s back is on the floor. Position must be established for 3 secs or more. No threat of a submission allowed.
Reversals (from side-control or mount)2 or 4Points awarded for reversing position from bottom to top: 2 points for ending in guard, 4 points for ending in side-control.
see more here: ADCC rules and regulations

Penalities in ADCC:

Penalty ConditionPenalty PointsDescription
Voluntarily jumping in the guard or moving to a non-standing position-1If the fighter remains down for 3 seconds or more, he receives a penalty point.
Disengaging from contact and avoiding engagement-1If a fighter starts backing up and avoids engaging again, he receives a penalty point.
Passivity-1A fighter who is passive will be warned twice before a penalty point is given. Further passivity results in immediate penalty points without further warnings.
Passivity during the first half of regular fights-1If a fighter is very passive during the first half, referees will warn them for passivity and punish them with a negative point when the second half starts.
Fixed fightDisqualificationIf two fighters (team-mates) are determined to have fixed a fight, they will both be disqualified from the tournament.
Constantly fleeing the mat-1A fighter who disengages from the fight by constantly fleeing the mat will be given a penalty point.
Fleeing the mat to escape a submission-1If a fighter tries to escape a submission by fleeing the mat more than once, he will be penalized.
Bad language or behavior from a fighter or coach-1Penalty points can be given for bad language or bad behavior from a fighter or his coach.
Not obeying the referees’ commands-1Penalty points can be given for not obeying the referees’ commands during the fight.
Intentional hits or kicksDisqualificationIf a fighter intentionally hits or kicks his opponent, he will be disqualified immediately.
Initiating illegal techniquesDisqualificationIf a fighter tries to initiate any of the illegal techniques, he will be disqualified immediately.

Other Notes on ADCC Competitions:

  • Initiating a submission from a dominant position (mount, side control, or in an opponent’s guard) and transitioning from top to bottom position will not award your opponent with sweep points, as you initiated the attack.
  • If an opponent initiates a sweep and you attempt a submission during their movement, they can still earn sweep points if they escape the submission and maintain control for 3 seconds, due to initiating the motion first.
  • No take down points are awarded if an opponent’s take down results in you adopting a turtle position for more than 3 seconds.
  • A penalty is incurred if you initiate a take down and transition to a guard or turtle position within 3 seconds, effectively breaking the attack.
  • A fighter will receive a penalty if, while both fighters are standing, they place one or both knees on the mat for more than 3 seconds.
  • A penalty will not be given for a failed take down attempt lasting more than 3 seconds that ends in pulling guard.
  • Fighters should continue to engage even if they go out of bounds; only a referee can stop the match and will resume the position in the center of the mat.
  • A fighter poked in the eye or hit in the groin area unintentionally, leading to bleeding, will be allowed 2 minutes for recovery. If they cannot continue after this period, they will forfeit the match.

NAGA  Point System

The North American Grappling Association or NAGA is another famous BJJ competition. What you can note here is that their point system for Gi competition is relatively similar to the IBJJF scoring system

Meanwhile, their No Gi point system slightly differs. But how? Know that there are points awarded if you are able to do submission attempts. 

Now, what are submission attempts? It means that you were able to position an attack but was unable to finish it. So if a submission attempt that fails to meet the full and strong criteria may be rewarded 1 point. Meanwhile, high percentage submission attempts may be awarded 2 points. 

Another thing that makes No Gi point scoring different is how they score take downs. If you were able to bring your open down, and you were able to get on a top position then you automatically get 2 points. But if you were only able to take them down, this will get 1 point. 

See table below for the NAGA No Gi Points.

Take downs1 or 2 Points
Submission Attempts1 or 2 Points
Sweeps2 Points
Side Control Variations2 Points
Mount2 Points
Back Grab2 Points
Knee on Belly2 Points

Strategies to Score Points in Competitions

Now, lets talk about some strategies to score points in competitions.

Each and every BJJ practitioner has their own way of playing the game. Some enter the mats, pull guard and begin working their way from there. Others, they come in and already have a strategy in mind. 

What is the advantage of the strategy? They have most likely calculated different points they can garner. Moreover, they have replayed the strategy in their heads already and created different scenarios with alternatives to counter attacks and defenses. 

Check out this video talking about how you can build a BJJ game play for a competition. 

Note that this is not only specific to competitions, you can practice your strategy during training also. This can help you become more familiar and find loopholes that you can improve on. 

Now, if you are interested in learning how to get 15 points easily in a BJJ competition, then you can go over this video of Robson “Mau Mau” de Lima Rodrigues.

Here’s the detailed step by step plan: 

  1. Trap the right leg in a half guard position
  2. Sit up, trap your opponent’s left arm using a Kimura grip
  3. Fall back, and maintain the grip 
  4. Escape your hips out to the left slightly
  5. Insert your butterfly hook
  6. From here, shift your hips back under your opponent
  7. Lift with your hook and roll your opponent to your right (2 points)
  8. Now, land in a half guard position, while maintaining a Kimura grip
  9. Use your right foot to free your leg and pass his half guard (3 points)
  10. Work your way to a knee mount (2 points)
  11. Drop down to a side mount then switch your base. 
  12. From here, swing your leg over to a mount (4 points)
  13. Dismount back to side mount, then circle over your opponent’s head to prop him up onto his right side.
  14. Next, step over your opponent with your left and allow him to catch that leg in his half guard. 
  15. Use a chair sit maneuver to get their back (4 points)
  16. Attack by choking them. 

Although these things can be effective, know that what can make you win the fastest is to be able to submit your opponent. Even if they were able to score points, but you submitted them first then you won. 

Just keep on training and learning! 

BJJ Point System – FAQ

What’s a Submission Only Tournament?

A submission only tournament is a type of competition where the winner wins by submission. But what makes this different from other types of BJJ competitions is that there is no point system. 

Therefore, even if your opponent was able to sweep you, that does not mean an advantage on their part. What matters is who is able to submit the other person faster.


What Are the Weight Classes of BJJ?

Weight classes in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu are an essential aspect of competition as they ensure fair match ups by dividing competitors based on their body weight. This arrangement aims to make contests more balanced, minimizing physical disparities and placing an emphasis on skill and technique.

The weight classes in BJJ competitions vary among different organizations, with the International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation (IBJJF) being the most widely recognized.

The IBJJF separates competitors into nine weight classes for male adults, which are as follows:

  1. Rooster: Up to 57.5 kg (126.5 lbs)
  2. Light Feather: Up to 64 kg (141 lbs)
  3. Feather: Up to 70 kg (154 lbs)
  4. Light: Up to 76 kg (167.5 lbs)
  5. Middle: Up to 82.3 kg (181 lbs)
  6. Medium Heavy: Up to 88.3 kg (194.5 lbs)
  7. Heavy: Up to 94.3 kg (207.5 lbs)
  8. Super Heavy: Up to 100.5 kg (221 lbs)
  9. Ultra Heavy: No upper weight limit.

For female adults, the IBJJF has six weight classes:

  1. Rooster: Up to 48.5 kg (107 lbs)
  2. Light Feather: Up to 53.5 kg (118 lbs)
  3. Feather: Up to 58.5 kg (129 lbs)
  4. Light: Up to 64 kg (141 lbs)
  5. Middle: Up to 69 kg (152 lbs)
  6. Heavy: No upper weight limit.

Weight classes may vary slightly between organizations, and it is essential to verify the specific guidelines before participating in a competition. When registering for a tournament, athletes should be mindful of the weight class they select, ensuring they can successfully make weight without compromising their performance or health.


What are Advantages and Penalties in Competitions?

Advantages in BJJ competitions means that you were able to get to a points scoring position. However, you were not able to maintain it for 3 seconds. 

On the other hand, penalties are given if you committed serious fouls or due to lack of combativeness.


Can You Pull Guard without a penalty or losing points?

Yes, you can pull guard without any penalty or losing points. But this will depend on the organization and the competition’s rule set. 

There are some that allow guard pulling and others require you to have contact with your opponent before pulling guard. While there are other hosts that do not allow this. 


What if no one scores any points?

At the end of the competition, none of you was able to score a point. Then a winner will still be declared. The question now is, how? This now will be the judge’s decision. 

They are responsible for reviewing the match and seeing who was more advantageous during the time. From here, they will declare the winner. 


How Many Points Is a Sweep from Bottom in BJJ?

In most BJJ competitions, a successful sweep is worth two points. To earn these points, an athlete must initiate the move from a guard or half-guard position and complete the reversal, ending up on top of their opponent. Additionally, the athlete must maintain this top position for at least three seconds to be awarded the two points.

It is important to recognize that sweeps performed from positions other than the guard or half-guard will not qualify for points.


How Many Points Is Closed Guard?

In BJJ competitions, the closed guard is a crucial position that allows athletes in the bottom position to maintain control over their opponents and create opportunities for submissions and sweeps.

However, unlike other positions such as the mount, back control, or knee-on-belly, the closed guard does not award any points in most point-based BJJ tournaments.


How Many Points Is a Knee on Your Stomach (Knee-on-Belly)?

Knee-on-belly, also known as knee-on-stomach, scores two points in most BJJ tournaments when executed correctly.

To be awarded points for this maneuver, an athlete must position their knee or shin across their opponent’s belly, chest, or ribs while keeping the opposing knee off the ground and, again, maintain it for 3 seconds.

Quick Tip: Knee-on-Belly is an excellent position to play in order to easily rack up points in competition.


Does a submission count for any points?

If you are wondering, if a submission counts as a point then the answer here is no.  A submission does not gain points, but it means victory. 

Hence, whoever was able to submit their combatant will automatically be declared the winner. This is regardless of the points garnered during the match.


Do You Get Points for Side Control BJJ?

In BJJ competitions, side control typically does not grant points directly. Rather, this position is normally acquired following a successful guard pass, for which the competitor would receive three points.

Keep in mind that to make side control most effective, the competitor must maintain constant pressure, immobilize the opponent, and be mindful of potential submission opportunities.


How Many Points Do I Get for Submission in Jiu Jitsu?

Unlike dominant positions and specific techniques, submissions are not assigned a point value. Instead, they are considered the ideal outcome in Brazilian jiu-jitsu matches, and some organizations will award advantages for submission attempts.


When Should I do my first competition?

There is no requirement as to when you should join your first competition. This will be your choice. If you think you are physically, mentally and emotionally ready, then do not hesitate to join one. 

But what we can recommend is to do it if you have been consistently training for around 6 months to 1 year. This will give you enough time to develop and learn things that you can apply once you step in those mats. 


What are Masters divisions?

The masters division in BJJ competition is part of the age bracket. Those who are qualified to be part of this are those who are 30 years old and above. 

One of the reasons why this division was made is to ensure safety and fairness to all competitors during the match. 

But one thing you can note is that, if you are over 30 and you want to participate in a lower age group (adults division) then this is fine.

If you want to learn more about the masters division, go ahead and click here. 


How long is a usual match

The exact duration of a BJJ match will rely on the competitor’s age bracket, belt, rules and the type of event. 

But more commonly, a typical match is around 5 minutes long for white belts. While those of a higher rank will have around 6-8 minutes. Meanwhile, for black belts, expect that the match will be longer. This will last for 10 minutes. 

Now for the kids’ division, the matches are generally 2-4 minutes long. This will depend on the age bracket. Note that this is just the general or more common duration. This will still vary depending on the event that you will be joining. 


How Do You Win a BJJ Match?

To win a BJJ match, a submission is the ultimate goal, as it demonstrates clear dominance over your opponent, who concedes defeat either by physically tapping out or verbally signaling their resignation.

If no submission occurs during a match, the winner is determined based on the points acquired from successful attempts at take downs, guard passes, sweeps, full mount, back control, and placing the knee on the belly.

The point system varies depending on the competition’s governing body but typically allocates a specific number of points for each position or maneuver. It is essential to maintain these positions for a stipulated time to secure the points.

Additionally, advantages and penalties come into play, and they impact the final score when there’s a tie.


How Do You Find BJJ Competitions?

First, consult your coach or instructor, as they often have extensive knowledge about local and regional tournaments and can direct you to reputable events.

Second, make use of social media and online resources to keep updated on upcoming events. Many BJJ organizations and tournament promoters actively use platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to advertise their events, registration deadlines, and other important information. Following these pages can keep you aware of what’s on the horizon.

Additionally, you can visit websites like Smoothcomp, BJJHERO, and the official pages for IBJJF, UAEJJF, and ADCC, offering event calendars and registration details.


How Much Do Competitions Cost?

Typically, registration fees for BJJ tournaments vary depending on the organizing body, location, and duration of the event.

Smaller, local competitions might charge around $50 to $100 for participation, while larger, more prestigious events like IBJJF or ADCC can charge upwards of $150 or more per competitor.

Aside from registration fees, keep in mind that there might also be additional costs, such as travel, lodging, food, and coaching expenses, especially for events held in different cities or countries. Furthermore, competitors might also need to purchase competition uniforms or gear that meet the requirements of the specific event.


What Are the Age Divisions?

The age divisions in bjj competitions are generally based on the competitors’ birth year and are designed to provide suitable matches between individuals of similar age, size, and skill level.

Typically, age divisions are classified into categories like juveniles (ages 16-17), adults (ages 18-29), masters (ages 30-35), and seniors (ages 36 and above).

Each age division is subdivided further into belt levels, such as white, blue, purple, brown, and black. This system enables competitors to face opponents with the same level of experience, ensuring fair competition.

In addition to age and belt divisions, competitors are also categorized by weight classes, further providing fair match ups among athletes. When preparing for a competition, make sure to understand the specific age and weight divisions required by the event’s organizing body to ensure eligibility and to train accordingly.


Do You Have to Compete in BJJ to Get a Blue Belt (Or Other Belts?)

While some academies encourage or even require students to compete before advancing, others do not have strict competition requirements. Ultimately, the decision to participate in BJJ competitions as a prerequisite for belt promotion is at the discretion of your coach or instructor.

In most gyms, you are not required to compete in order to progress through the ranks. Although competing frequently will certain increase your progress.


Hope this post has been insightful – thanks for reading and hope you have a good day – Zack